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City of Manhattan wants you to vote on its new flag

The City of Manhattan's current flag
The City of Manhattan's current flag(WIBW)
Published: Jun. 28, 2019 at 6:42 PM CDT
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...And then there were 7.

In its search for a new flag, the City of Manhattan has whittled the initial 120 designs down to just seven. Now, it's asking residents to pick their favorites. Voting starts on Monday, July 1.

People can vote either online or in person.

Voting online can be done at

In-person voting can be done at the customer service window at City Hall, 1101 Poyntz Ave., across from City Park.

But, to prevent anyone from stuffing the ballot box, the City has imposed some strict rules. Only one vote will be allowed from each computer's IP address and only one ballot will be handed out per person for people voting in person.

The City says the designs were inspired by the Flint Hills, the Big Blue and Kansas Rivers, the Kansas motto, and more that makes Manhattan special.

The colors of the flag are meant to represent:

GREEN:

fertility of the land, opportunity for growth, and the native grasses of the Flint Hills

GOLD:

sunshine and agriculture, prosperity, and the friendly nature of Manhattan residents

BLUE:

The Big Blue and Kansas Rivers, peace, and the expansive sky over the prairie

WHITE:

Manhattan’s limitless future

PURPLE:

K-State, the figurative and geographical heart of Manhattan as a college town

All of the flags are shown in the slideshow below and the City offered descriptions of what they all mean:

A - Ring of Stars

The two blue stripes represent the Big Blue and Kansas Rivers, which border Manhattan and provide one of the most important natural resources for any community.

The stars represent the Kansas State motto Ad Astra per Aspera (to the stars, through difficulties).

The number of stars represents the five City Commissioners who govern the City, the five officials in the 1855 Constitution of the Manhattan Town Association, as well as the founding members of Bluemont Central College in 1859, which became Kansas State University.

B - Shining Star of the Prairie

The wave going through the center represents the Flint Hills. Its green interior is symbolic of fertility and growth. Its gold edge symbolizes the native grasses and sunflowers that Kansas is known for, as well as prosperity and agriculture.

The blue half of the design represents the blue skies of Kansas.

The star ties in with the state motto, and reflects the position of Manhattan in the state of Kansas.

C - Little Apple on the Prairie

The apple rising out of the hillside symbolizes the city's growth as a land of opportunity, and recognizing Manhattan's nickname as "The Little Apple."

The shape of the hillside is a reference to the gently rolling Flint Hills, and the green color represents the wealth of natural resources in the area.

D - Rolling Hills

The green represents fertility, growth, opportunity, and the distinctive native grasses of the area.

The gold sun represents the gorgeous sunsets in the region, as well as the wealth of resources, and bright future of the community.

The five stars in an arch over the upper half of the “coin” tie in with the state motto (ad astra per aspera) and represent the five City Commissioners, as well as the five officials in the original Constitution of the Manhattan Town Association, and the founding members of Bluemont Central College.

E - Sunflower

This flag is meant to unite the unique elements of the City of Manhattan, while also tying in to K-State.

The gold represents the Konza Prairie, as well as the positive energy and optimism of Manhattan residents.

The sunflower represents Kansas as the Sunflower State. Its purple center honors K-State, representing the wisdom and pride of Manhattan, and the apple in the center is a nod to Manhattan's nickname "The Little Apple."

The blue stripes represent the Big Blue and Kansas Rivers, which border Manhattan.

F - Confluence

The triangular formation of the blue and the gold symbolizes the city and the nearby confluence of the Kansas and Big Blue rivers. Their colors, as mentioned on other designs, represent native grasses, sunshine, agriculture, prosperity, friendliness, and peace.

The stars represent the Kansas State motto Ad Astra per Aspera (to the stars, through difficulties).

The number of stars represents the five City Commissioners who govern the City, the five officials in the 1855 Constitution of the Manhattan Town Association, as well as the founding members of Bluemont Central College in 1859.

G - Heritage

The chevrons represent U.S. Army enlisted rank insignias, a head prairie grass, as well as the shaft of an arrow. The left Chevrons represent Fort Riley, west of town, and our culture shaped by the Fort. The Right chevrons represent Manhattan’s agricultural roots as well as the Native Heritage of the Kaw Nation.

The white diamond represents the City of Manhattan, its civic pride and the pursuit of progress. The purple diamond nested in the white diamond represents K-State University, the figurative and geographical heart of Manhattan as a college town.

Blue stripes at the top and bottom signify the Big Blue and Kansas Rivers that border Manhattan.

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