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Our Declaration of Independence


by Melissa Brunner


As we fill up on our barbecues and await the fireworks, I invite you to take a little time to reflect on the reason we have these celebrations every July 4th. It is a day to honor the freedoms we cherish as Americans and give a nod to those who made those freedoms possible back in 1776 and those who work to preserve them today. The latter group would include all the men and women in military service, but I'd also include those who, through their public service, professional endeavors or volunteer efforts also, in some small way, work to ensure everyone in our communities is able to enjoy those "unalienable Rights" - Life, Liberty and the pursuit of happiness.


I've copied here the text of the Declaration of Independence. Read it and take a few moments to appreciate the risk taken by the 56 signees to create a nation which we enjoy today.


I have taken out the section which lists the specific grievances against Britain, but you can read those and find other information about the Declaration on the National Archives site - www.archives.gov.


IN CONGRESS, July 4, 1776.


The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America,


When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.


We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.--That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, --That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.


(At this point, the Congress lists its specific grievances with Britain.)


We, therefore, the Representatives of the united States of America, in General Congress, Assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do. And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.


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