Storm Chasers, TV Personalities Among Oklahoma Fatalities

By: CNN, Posted by Chelsey Moran
By: CNN, Posted by Chelsey Moran
A group of men who devoted their lives to hunting powerful storms died in the middle of the chase.

TWISTEX team member Carl Young was killed along with Tim and Paul Samaras while chasing a tornado (Facebook/CNN).

(CNN) -- A group of men who devoted their lives to hunting powerful storms died in the middle of the chase.

Tim Samaras, his son Paul Samaras, and Carl Young were killed while following a tornado in El Reno, Oklahoma, relatives told CNN on Sunday. They were among nine people killed in storms that struck Oklahoma on Friday night.

Their work tracking tornadoes was featured on the former Discovery Channel show "Storm Chasers."

"They all unfortunately passed away but doing what they loved," Jim Samaras wrote in a statement posted on his brother's Facebook page.

Tim Samaras founded TWISTEX, the Tactical Weather Instrumented Sampling in Tornadoes Experiment, to help learn more about tornadoes and increase lead time for warnings, according to the official website.

In 2004, he told CNN that being near storms was part of the job.

"In order to get directly in the path, you have to be close," he said.

"Actually I'm pretty focused on our safety, certainly, and I'm focused on getting the data and getting the right spot," he said. "You only have one chance to do it."

CNN meteorologist Chad Myers, who also covered Friday's storm in Oklahoma, said Tim Samaras was known for his attention to safety.

"There's just no one safer than Tim. Tim, he would never put himself in danger," Myers said. "He certainly wouldn't put his son in danger."

One of Samaras' goals, Myers said, was collecting more data to help government officials.

"We all know that this is difficult and dangerous and sometimes things go wrong. But I think to portray Tim as just a chaser out for a thrill is just the wrong thing," Myers said. "I just want people to know that Tim was a scientist. He was out there to put probes out there. He was out there to learn and understand and to make science more understandable. ... We all go out there and we try to protect the public, but Tim was even one step higher."

Doug Kiesling, a videographer who chases storms and calls himself "The Weather Paparazzi," said the three men were more than storm chasers. "They're researchers," he said.

"This thing is really shaking up everyone in the chasing community," he said. "We knew this day would happen someday, but nobody would imagine that it would happen to Tim. Tim was one of the safest people to go out there. ... He's had close calls but he's always had an escape route."

El Reno Mayor Matt White didn't provide details about those killed after the tornado struck, but he stressed the importance of staying indoors when powerful storms hit.

"We had to deal with not only strong winds, but we had extreme hail, extreme softball-size hail. El Reno had a lot of damage to the roads," he told reporters on Sunday. "In these situations, we can't stress enough to people to stay inside and do what the weather men and women tell us to do."

Friday's storm was particularly unpredictable, according to Mike Bettes, an anchor and meteorologist for The Weather Channel who had a close call himself. The tornado swept up the tornado-hunt truck he and a crew were traveling in, tossed it 200 yards into a field and smashed it to the ground.

"I think this was just an erratic tornado. I think the size of it and the speed of it changed very, very quickly," he told CNN on Sunday morning. "I think the direction of movement changed quickly. And I think there were a lot of people out there that, you know, ended up getting stuck in positions we didn't want to be in."

Bettes described the experience as the scariest moment of his life.

"I saw people in my life, I saw their faces flash right in front of me. And it just seemed for a moment, everything was in slow motion, especially when we were floating," he said. "I kind of felt like I was being lifted to heaven or something. I was conscious through the whole thing and remember the whole thing, but it's still a surreal moment."

The experience left him rattled, and unsure whether he'll go out to chase storms again. But Bettes said he had no doubt about the value of storm chasing.

"We show weather, and we like to be out there and show people what these things can do, and help give advance warning. A lot of times the storm spotters out there serve a very valuable purpose. They give ground truth to what meteorologists from the National Weather Service are doing," he said. "But seeing it in person, seeing it for real, and giving that real time information, I think really supplements the warning. It helps people take shelter ahead of time."

"Storm Chasers" aired for five years on the Discovery Channel. The last season ended in the fall of 2011. The network expressed condolences in a statement Sunday.

"We are deeply saddened by the loss of Carl Young, Tim Samaras and his son. Our thoughts and prayers go out to their families," the statement said.


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