Screening Set For Type I Diabetes Research Study

TOPEKA, Kan. (WIBW) - Topeka is part of a major trial that aims to get answers about Type I diabetes by looking at the relatives of those already diagnosed.

Amy Kincade knows how important it is. Her son, Brennan, was diagnosed with the disease when he was 11-years old. She says she felt a bit of guilt because he had all the classic signs of diabetes that she was familiar with as a nurse, but she didn't recognize them as a mom.

Given that experience, Amy's worried that her daughter, Sadie, is at risk, too. So the Kincaids decided to take part in a research study at the Cotton-O'Neil Diabetes Center. The TrialNet Natural History Type I Diabetes study has relatives of those with Type I diabetes get a blood test to screen for three auto antibodies which could signal a higher risk they, too, will develop the disease.

Project coordinator Jessica Horton says a positive test doesn't mean a person will definitely develop diabetes, but it can put families on alert for signs of the disease or even steer them toward other trials testing prevention methods.

Now 17, Amy says Brennan is doing great handling his diabetes and Sadie is negative for the antibodies. The screening not only gave mom peace of mind, but a sense she's advocating for her kids. She says such research is a huge opportunity to learn more about the disease.

TOPEKA, Kan. (WIBW) - Topeka is part of a major trial that aims to get answers about Type I diabetes by looking at the relatives of those already diagnosed.

Amy Kincade knows how important it is. Her son, Brennan, was diagnosed with the disease when he was 11-years old. She says she felt a bit of guilt because he had all the classic signs of diabetes that she was familiar with as a nurse, but she didn't recognize them as a mom.

Given that experience, Amy's worried that her daughter, Sadie, is at risk, too. So the Kincaids decided to take part in a research study at the Cotton-O'Neil Diabetes Center. The TrialNet Natural History Type I Diabetes study has relatives of those with Type I diabetes get a blood test to screen for three auto antibodies which could signal a higher risk they, too, will develop the disease.

Project coordinator Jessica Horton says a positive test doesn't mean a person will definitely develop diabetes, but it can put families on alert for signs of the disease or even steer them toward other trials testing prevention methods.

Now 17, Amy says Brennan is doing great handling his diabetes and Sadie is negative for the antibodies. The screening not only gave mom peace of mind, but a sense she's advocating for her kids. She says such research is a huge opportunity to learn more about the disease.

To take part:
The Cotton O'Neil Diabetes Center is hosting a screening fair for the TrialNet study on March 10th.

Immediate family members of a person with Type 1 diabetes who are under age 45 and second-degree relatives under age 20 are eligible.

Further details on the TrialNet study:

The Cotton-O'Neil Clinical Research Center is offering free screenings for relatives of individuals with type 1 diabetes to determine their risk of developing the disease as a part of the TrialNet Natural History Type 1 Diabetes Studies. TrialNet is a network of clinical trial centers dedicated to the study, prevention, and early treatment of type 1 diabetes. The goal of this study is to learn more about how type 1 diabetes develops in "at risk" individuals and how to potentially prevent the onset of the disease.

Individuals eligible to participate in the TrialNet Natural History Study must be:

Ages 1 through 45 and have a brother, sister, child, or parent with type 1 diabetes, OR
Ages 1 thorough 20 and have a cousin, aunt, uncle, niece, nephew, half-sibling, or grandparent with type 1 diabetes.
The purpose of screening is to identify people who are at risk for developing type 1 diabetes by doing a simple blood test that detects auto antibodies that are associated with the development of the disease. Auto antibodies are a sign that your immune system may be attacking the insulin-producing cells in your pancreas; about 3-to-4 percent of family members of individuals with type 1 diabetes have auto antibodies and are at higher risk. Individuals identified as having a greater risk of developing type 1 diabetes may be offered the opportunity to continue on to other phases of the TrialNet Natural History Study, which includes close monitoring for the development of diabetes. They may also participate in studies testing new treatments to delay or prevent the onset of diabetes. If participants develop diabetes during the TrialNet Natural History Study, they may be eligible to participate in studies aimed at slowing the progression of type 1 diabetes. If diabetes can be delayed, even for a few years, those at risk may be able to postpone the difficult challenges of trying to control their glucose levels and the potential development of serious complications.


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