Jailed U.S. Journalist In Iran Freed

By: CBS/AP
By: CBS/AP

(CBS/AP) An American journalist imprisoned on espionage charges in Iran for four months was freed Monday and reunited with her smiling, tearful parents, who prepared to return home with her to the U.S. in the coming days.

The release of Roxana Saberi clears a major obstacle to President Barack Obama's attempts at a dialogue with the top U.S. adversary in the Middle East. Washington had called the charges against the 32-year-old dual Iranian-American citizen baseless and repeatedly demanded her release.

Hard-line President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad could also win some domestic political points a month before he faces a re-election challenge from reformers who seek to ease Iran's bitter rivalry with the United States.

Saberi's Iranian-born father, Reza Saberi, wiped away tears, then flashed a broad smile as he and his wife, Akiko, arrived at Tehran's Evin prison - notorious for holding political prisoners - to meet their daughter. Akiko Saberi, who is of Japanese origin, wore a flowered headscarf.

"I'm very happy that she is free. Roxana is in good condition," Reza Saberi said later at his family home in Tehran. "We had expected her release but not so soon. She will be preparing to leave (Iran) tomorrow or the day after tomorrow."

The younger Saberi, who was taken out of Evin through a back door away from journalists, was not seen after her release. She was staying with her parents at a friend's home, apparently to avoid publicity before leaving Iran.

Her release came when an appeals court reduced her eight-year prison sentence on charges of spying for the U.S. to a two-year suspended sentence, said Iranian judiciary spokesman Ali Reza Jamshidi. He said Saberi was free to leave Iran.

The court ordered the reduction as a gesture of "Islamic mercy" because she had cooperated with authorities and had expressed regret, he said.

"There was enough back-channel pressure on Tehran from U.N. members and from global leaders, to release Roxana Saberi," said CBS News foreign affairs analyst Pamela Falk at the U.N. "Iran is already under pressure for its defiance on its nuclear program and because it did not serve the government's interest when the presidential election campaign is heating up."

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton welcomed the release.

"Obviously, we continue to take issue with the charges against her and the verdicts rendered, but we are very heartened that she has been released, and wish her and her family all of the very best," Clinton said in a statement.

The release ends an ordeal for Saberi, who was convicted and sentenced in a secret session by a security court. Her father said the trial lasted only 15 minutes and her lawyer was not given time to defend her.

(AP Photo/Hasan Sarbakhshian)(Reza Saberi and his wife Akiko, parents of U.S.-Iranian journalist Roxana Saberi, wait before their daughter Roxana leaves jail outside of Evin prison in Tehran on May 11, 2009.)

Her parents, who live in Fargo, N.D., rushed to Iran to seek her freedom. At one point, the younger Saberi held a hunger strike protesting her jailing, but ended it after two weeks when her parents, visiting her in prison, asked her to stop because her health was weakening.

Saberi, who was crowned the 1997 Miss North Dakota, moved to Iran six years ago and had worked as a freelance journalist for several organizations, including NPR and the British Broadcasting Corp.

She was arrested in late January, but it was not known until Feb. 10, when she called her father in Fargo and told him she had been detained. She said it was because she had bought a bottle of wine, which is illegal in Iran but available on the black market. Her parents decided not to publicize the news until early March when their concerns grew because their regular communications with her were cut off.

The next day, Iran's Foreign Ministry acknowledged her arrest, saying she was working in the country illegally because her press credentials were revoked in 2006. But when she was put on trial in mid-April, she was convicted on much harsher charges of spying for the United States.

The conviction and heavy sentence brought strong criticism from the U.S. and other countries at a time when Mr. Obama was reaching out to Tehran. Iranian leaders have given mixed signals to the U.S. outreach, sometimes appearing cold, but at times expressing optimism over possible talks. Saberi's arrest, however, was seen by many in the West as a sign that at least some hard-liners in Tehran may be trying to scuttle any overtures.

In the face of U.S. criticism, Ahmadinejad and others sounded a more moderate tone, promising that Saberi's case would get a full review on appeal.

On Sunday, the appeals court convened for five hours, allowing the defense to make its case. Her lawyers emerged saying they were able to defend her and were optimistic her sentence would be reduced.

Saberi family friends in Fargo were elated at news of her release. Last month, many had tied yellow ribbons around trees in the quiet upscale neighborhood along the Red River Valley to show support for her.

Marianna Malm, Saberi's former English teacher at Fargo North High School, was in tears Monday as she prepared for work.

"They are tears of joy," Malm said. "It's an overwhelming announcement."

Sen. Byron Dorgan, D-N.D., called Saberi's imprisonment a miscarriage of justice that "could not stand the test of public opinion."

Dorgan said Iranian officials likely felt the weight of international pressure.

"Obviously this means Iran has responded in the right way to this situation," Dorgan said. "They're moving to correct something that was a terrible miscarriage of justice."

© MMIX, CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.


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